Halloween: Our Most Visual Holiday

For those of you reading this in the future, today is Halloween. If Halloween does not exist in your time, I can tell you that it was an ancient custom filled with magic, during which kids dressed like monsters, men dressed like women, and women dressed like they were in Las Vegas. Everyone got candy, except for the kids who went to that one house where they gave out apples and toothbrushes.

If you are a time-traveling visitor from the past, here are some interesting facts about today’s Halloween: We don’t carve jack-o-lanterns out of turnips anymore! Now we use pumpkins. (Did you know that pumpkins are actually a fruit, not a vegetable? It’s a crazy world we live in.) And jack-o-lanterns, instead of welcoming the souls of deceased loved ones the way they used to, now welcome ungrateful, entitled children in plastic masks from Wal Mart.

Halloween is one of the most striking holidays from a visual perspective. It has a distinctive color palette: ominous, somber black, and the official color of prop comedian Carrot Top, orange. Centuries ago, Halloween was associated with orange and black because of the season of the holiday (fall) and the time of day that the holiday was observed (night).

These days, the visual vernacular of Halloween is spooky and ghoulish—ghosts, demons, witches, and all sorts of gruesome stuff:

Halloween has lost most of its original reason for being as a religious holiday, and it’s now perpetuated almost entirely through a commonly accepted visual aesthetic (also through the promise of candy). Ultimately, when the trick-or-treaters come by our houses tonight, we’ll all be aware that we’re witnessing a really well-branded product, with a well-defined color palette and visual voice.

That said, I hope you’ll share photos of your costumes with us either here on the blog or on our Facebook page. Happy Halloween!

Please Read Signs

Friends of IBD continue to send pictures of funny and interesting signs our way. Over the last few years and many presentations later, our collection of funny signs and/or interesting approaches to design continues to grow. Recently the phenomenon has expanded to the IBD Facebook page, where a rash of photo shares have been taking place. I had to share some of these images with you.

I didn’t know they called my wife’s cooking science.

Looks as if they need some gradient off.

I always travel with my pair of counterforms just in case the opportunity to swim with marine stingers presents itself. It happens more than you would think. (I’m not sure what this comment means either.)

We know what we can’t do.

This is just awesome on so many levels.

I love the fact that people are thinking about us over the holidays, (even if it didn’t mean any gifts for us from readers). Just knowing that someone interrupted holiday shopping to take a picture of bad typography for us is the best gift we could receive (next to a 60 inch LCD HDTV or a New York Yankees grill cover).  Thank you Jeanette for the effort! This picture illustrates the worst use of the word “holiday” since Madonna’s 1983 use.

Sometimes you just have to state the obvious.

If you are on Facebook and haven’t liked IBD (not like like, but like like) you should check out the page. There are more images like these under the photo tab. Keep the images coming!